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Date Name Organization Name Requested Amount

Name of your organization. Barnes Foundation

Person making request. Laura Bramble

Best way to contact you. lbramble@barnesfoundation.org

Address 2025 Benjamin Franklin Parkway Philadelphia, PA 19130

Website / URL http://www.barnesfoundation.org

EIN 23-6000149

Amount Requested 10000

Case for Request. As you may know, Philadelphia art collector Dr. Albert C. Barnes (1872–1951) chartered the Barnes Foundation in 1922 in Merion, Pennsylvania, to teach people from all walks of life how to look at and appreciate art through the direct study of his collection. Over three decades, he acquired some of the world’s most renowned impressionist, post-impressionist, and modern paintings, including works by Renoir, Cézanne, Matisse, and Picasso. He displayed these masterpieces alongside important examples of American art; old master paintings; African sculpture; Native American objects; medieval manuscripts and sculptures; decorative and industrial arts; and antiquities from the Mediterranean region and Asia. Integrating art and craft, and objects spanning cultures and time periods, Barnes sought to demonstrate the continuity of artistic tradition and the universal impulse for creative expression. Establishing the Foundation with the mission to promote the advancement of education and the appreciation of the fine arts and horticulture, Dr. Barnes believed that art should be accessible to all and has the power to improve minds and transform lives. He implemented free art appreciation classes in 1925. To better serve his educational mission, the Barnes moved in 2012 to Center City Philadelphia. Since then, nearly 2.3 million people from all 50 states and 130 countries have visited Dr. Barnes’s unrivaled collection, participated in educational courses and seminars, attended special exhibitions, and taken part in a variety of public and community engagement programs. This year, the Barnes celebrates both the 100th anniversary of its founding, and the 10th anniversary of its move to Philadelphia, which has allowed the Barnes to become a gathering place for the community, uniting people across generations and cultures, as well as an active participant in neighborhoods, working with community partners and change agents directly in the communities we serve. In the last five years, the Barnes has taken what is, for a museum, the unusual step of growing beyond traditional artistic and educational portfolios, capitalizing on other core competencies to extend its activity significantly into the social services arena. In 2019, Valerie Gay was appointed Deputy Director for Audience Engagement & Chief Experience Officer with the charge of overseeing the Barnes’s critical work in developing and sustaining our public and community engagement programs and expanding our diversity and inclusion initiatives throughout the Philadelphia region. Under the leadership of Barbara Wong, Director of Community Engagement, the Barnes has partnered with various local and regional public service agencies, with which we have developed summer camp and after-school programs for vulnerable early learners and youth; virtual access programs for seniors and under resourced communities; job training programs for recently incarcerated individuals; community arts and education hubs in West and South Philadelphia; and ELL/ESL biliteracy development programs for immigrant families. These programs integrate the Barnes into the larger fabric of Philadelphia and reach across the city and beyond to break down traditional barriers to participation in the arts, meeting people where they live, work, study, and play. Puentes a las Arts / Bridges to the Arts, specifically, is a free arts-based biliteracy enrichment program for early learners from South Philadelphia’s Latinx immigrant community and their families, many of which are living at or below poverty level. Since 2017, the Barnes has partnered with Puentes de Salud, a Philadelphia-based nonprofit that promotes the health and wellness of the city’s growing Latinx community, in this unique learning initiative that addresses obstacles to success in education. Puentes a las Artes reaches a vulnerable population of families who lack access to high-quality learning and enrichment opportunities. Guided by bilingual teaching artists, the program offers emergent bilingual learners an opportunity to develop cognitive, linguistic, and visual literacy skills, and supports adult caregivers in developing additional strategies and activities to reinforce and extend learning at home. Through this initiative, students also demonstrate a growing independence, gain social/emotional confidence in the classroom, become more comfortable with new vocabulary, and switch between English and Spanish to express ideas. Along with after-school instruction, the program provides training and resources for parents, caregivers, and siblings through bilingual family tours, workshops, and family programming at the Barnes. Puentes a las Artes has fostered trusting relationships across participants, parents, and partners, ensuring a greater likelihood for a positive start to children’s early education and a continuity in developing socialization skills. During the pandemic, Barnes staff developed a hybrid approach where teaching artists and staff have worked to stay connected to early learners and their families remotely, as continuity is critical to ensuring momentum for early learning and development. Programming has included bilingual weekly classes on Zoom with virtual visits to the Barnes collection and art-making lessons, home delivery of books and art kits, monthly check-in calls to support at-home literacy development, and open access to videos of teaching artists and staff reading storybooks. In these uncertain times, Puentes a las Artes continues to provide high-quality learning and social-emotional support for early learners as well as essential support services for parents. With the ongoing pandemic, this program has not only advanced the biliteracy development of early learners, but school teachers have highlighted their appreciation for the program’s impact on building their students’ school readiness. Students who participate in Puentes a las Artes are observed to be better equipped with the social emotional skills, curiosity and confidence necessary to be successful in kindergarten and Head Start classrooms. The Barnes aims to resume in-person afterschool programming for the 2022-23 academic year, while also continuing some remote learning to meet the needs of more early learners and families. Family workshops and visits to the Barnes will continue once a month. Puentes a las Artes programming exemplifies the Quaker values of equality and community, building bridges, encouraging trust and dialogue, and supporting under-resourced Latinx communities in their effort to improve their lives, education and circumstances. As the Snave Foundation provides support for not-for-profit educational institutions that reflect Quaker ideals, the Barnes Foundation respectfully requests Foundation sponsorship to submit a Major Grant proposal for this community engagement initiative. Thank you for your kind consideration of this request.

Submission Date 05/04/2022

Submitter's IP 136.143.176.51

Name of your organization. Friends Place on Capitol Hill (Friends Place)

Person making request. Alex Wilson

Best way to contact you. alexwilson@fcnl.org

Address 515 E Capitol Street, SE Washington, DC 20003

Website / URL https://www.friendsplacedc.org/

EIN 52-0846718

Amount Requested 1000

Case for Request. Friends Place on Capitol Hill (Friends Place) respectfully requests $1,000 from the SNAVE Foundation to help us design and launch an experiential Quaker civic engagement program for young people—from middle school to college aged. A 501(c)3 Quaker guesthouse and learning center previously known as William Penn House, Friends Place advances civic engagement for young people. Purchased in 1966 by the Friends Meeting of Washington to accommodate Quaker anti-war activists working with the Friends Committee on National Legislation, this historic property on East Capitol Street has been integral to the Quaker presence on Capitol Hill and has served as an important organizing space. For example, William Penn House opened its doors to the Poor People’s Campaign in 1968 and provided organizers with a place to plan Resurrection City. In more recent years, William Penn House served as a housing and hospitality center for members of youth movements (including the Sunrise Movement) as they prepared for and participated in protests in the nation’s capital. William Penn House formally transferred its operations to the FCNL Education Fund in 2019 to sustain and grow a Quaker presence in Washington D.C. Friends Place maintains a separate Board of Directors, operates under its own tax-exempt status, and currently receives recoverable grants from the FCNL Education Fund for operating expenses. To limit overhead, we operate under a shared services model: the FCNL Education Fund provides needed fundraising, communications, and administrative support. The goal is for Friends Place to achieve full financial sustainability by 2024 through building use revenue and individual donors. Friends Place and the SNAVE Foundation A new movement for a richer civic education in the United States is alive and well. Prompted by partisan divisiveness, racial reckoning, the health of the planet and structural economic, political and social changes that challenge the cohesion of American democracy, the 2021 “Educating for American Democracy” report offers a roadmap for education in self-governance. Schools are on the forefront of assuring that children understand the American experiment and their role in it. Community and faith groups, non-profit organizations, labor unions, and businesses all play a role in assuring full and equitable participation in our communities, our country, and in the world. Friends Place will play a role in the movement for stronger civic education and engagement. With the SNAVE Foundation’s support, Friends Place will build on its 55-year history of success as we launch an experiential Quaker civic engagement program for middle, high school, and college students that complements and extends the civic education received in school. This programming will be offered year-round and will be adaptable to school schedules and curriculum requirements. Centered around how people power creates justice, peace, a healthy planet, and a stronger democracy, Friends Place programming will engage young people in solutions to structural problems that prohibit the full realization of American democracy. Quaker faith and practice offer profound opportunities for young people to experience lifelong leadings for social justice work. With robust programming that is ethically and morally grounded in Quakerism, Friends Place will empower F/friends to put their faith into action and live their convictions. The Director of Friends Place, Sarah Johnson, will develop, market, and operationalize our new programming as well as establish partnerships with F/friends middle, high, and post-secondary schools; churches; meetings; and organizations that will bring groups to stay at Friends Place. Several institutions that have already expressed interest in bringing student groups to Friends Place include Wilmington College (OH), Dallas Peace and Justice Center (TX), and Friends Seminary (NY). We look forward to engaging these institutions in Friends Place programming while building a broader participant base. Committed to fostering inclusive programming that reaches diverse, multi-cultural audiences, we will pay particular attention to establishing partnerships with historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs), Hispanic-serving institutions (HSIs), Tribal colleges and universities (TCUs), and faith-based organizations. We will begin offering programming in early 2022. Conclusion With the SNAVE Foundation’s support and partnership, we will help young people across the country to recognize their power and role in democracy. These young people will leave Friends Place with knowledge they can take back to their communities, extending the impact of our experiential learning opportunity across the country. Thank you in advance for your time and consideration of our request, and please do not hesitate to reach out with any questions.

Submission Date 09/29/2021

Submitter's IP 136.143.177.50

Name of your organization. Friends Place on Capitol Hill

Person making request. Alex Wilson

Best way to contact you. alexwilson@fcnl.org

Address 515 E Capitol Street, SE Washington, DC 20003

Website / URL

EIN 52-0846718

Amount Requested 150000

Case for Request. Friends Place on Capitol Hill (Friends Place) respectfully requests $150,000 over two years from the SNAVE Foundation to repair and modernize our historic, 104-year-old Quaker building as well as design and pilot an experiential Quaker civic engagement program for middle, high school, and college students. Friends Place, a 501(c)3 Quaker guesthouse and learning center previously known as William Penn House, advances civic engagement for young people. Purchased in 1966 by the Friends Meeting of Washington to accommodate Quaker anti-war activists working with the Friends Committee on National Legislation (FCNL), William Penn House has been integral to the Quaker presence on Capitol Hill and has served as an important organizing space. For example, William Penn House opened its doors to the Poor People’s Campaign in 1968 and provided organizers with a place to plan Resurrection City. William Penn House formally transferred its operations to the FCNL Education Fund in 2019 and began its next phase of service as Friends Place on Capitol Hill: an FCNL Education Fund subsidiary and FCNL-affiliate organization. Since 2019, and despite the COVID-19 pandemic, we have worked to upgrade and modernize the building. With the SNAVE Foundation’s support, we will be able to finish building repairs this fall and accommodate overnight guests beginning spring 2022. To-date, we have made substantial progress in major repairs to the roof, electrical equipment, and plumbing. Following these and other structural repairs, we will focus on needed improvements like painting, floor refinishing, new appliances, and furnishings. When finished, Friends Place will feature a conference space equipped for remote meetings, a second-floor meeting room that adjoins a dining room/kitchen area, and seven sleeping rooms that can accommodate up to 29 overnight guests. With the Foundation’s support, Friends Place will also design and pilot an experiential Quaker civic engagement program for middle, high school, and college students that complements and extends the civic education received in school. Centered around how people power creates justice, peace, a healthy planet, and a stronger democracy, Friends Place programming (which may include a direct service-learning component) will engage young people in solutions to structural problems that prohibit the full realization of American democracy. Quaker faith and practice offers profound opportunities for young people to experience lifelong leadings for social justice work. With robust programming that is ethically and morally grounded in Quakerism, Friends Place will empower F/friends to put their faith into action and become effective advocates for the world they seek. We are in the process of hiring a Director of Friends Place to develop, market, and test our new program as well as establish formal partnerships with F/friends middle, upper, and post-secondary schools; churches; meetings; and organizations that will bring groups to stay at Friends Place. Through FCNL’s Young Adult Program, we have fostered robust partnerships with several Quaker-based institutions that have already expressed interest in bringing student groups to Friends Place, including Wilmington College. We plan to launch virtual programming in winter 2021 and begin offering in-person programming in spring 2022. Friends Place currently receives recoverable grants from the FCNL Education Fund to cover operating expenses and, to limit overhead, operates under a shared services model; the FCNL Education Fund provides needed fundraising, communications, and administrative support. With the SNAVE Foundation’s partnership over the first two years of Friends Place’s rebirth, we will ensure the organization achieves full financial sustainability by 2024 and can grow in the years to come. Thank you in advance for your time and consideration of our request, and please do not hesitate to reach out with any questions.

Submission Date 06/23/2021

Submitter's IP 204.141.42.226

Name of your organization. Media Providence Friends School

Person making request. Cynthia McGoff

Best way to contact you. cmcgoff@mpfs.org

Address 125 W. Third Street Media, PA 19063

Website / URL http://mpfs.org

EIN 23-1386177

Amount Requested 30000

Case for Request. Long before 1954, when the Supreme Court decided Brown vs. Board of Education, MPFS enrolled its first student of color. "The school met with its most serious financial crisis, not from the Depression but from the admission of its first Negro student in 1937" (A Century of Love and Learning). Despite being a Quaker institution, and living by the Quaker Testimonies, a number of families protested and MPFS lost about 30% of its enrollment and, yet, did not waver in its decision. This decision directly informed the type of school MPFS would grow to become today: a learning community that not only teaches social justice but is committed to evolving our understanding of race and racism to best serve our community. In the Spring of 2020, we knew it was important to share more explicitly how we incorporate our Justice, Equity, Diversity, Inclusivity (JEDI) work into our program, across all subjects and throughout the year. Hence the birth of the MPFS JEDI Task Force, made up of teachers, families, administration, and trustees. Our JEDI goals, broadly outlined, are to foster positive identities (racial, gender, religion, sexuality, family structure, class & ability) in our students, staff, families, and trustees, and encourage their personal development by: raising awareness and building literacy by engaging in explicit conversations about our identities honoring the intersectionality that exists within ourselves and members of our community, thus increasing our capacity for empathy encouraging our community to take action when they see injustice, prejudice, and bigotry in the world. We understand this work is dynamic and ongoing and will require us to continue to learn and grow. Teachers have incorporated social justice in a wide variety of ways over many years, and not just in January and February. Social Justice is wide-reaching across subjects and is honored throughout the curriculum all year long. We are committed to being more intentional about communicating and sharing our JEDI work with our community, as well as bringing more professional development and family events centered around JEDI topics and engagement. Some of these have/will include: 20-21:The MPFS Listening Campaign, facilitated by the Philly Children’s Movement ($2500). We intend to include members of our extended communities in 21-22 The Race Institute (faculty training) with Toni Graves Williamson and Ali Michaels, 50% of our faculty are trained 20-21. We aim to train the remaining 50% (21-22 for $13,000) February 2021: Access to the film Virtually Free by Andre Robert Lee ($5000). We intend to schedule more film screenings in the coming years ($5000+ for 21-22) February 2021: Q&A sessions with Andre Robert Lee for our middle school students and our families April 2021: Sonja Cherry Paul joins our faculty meeting and also presents to families. $2500 April 2021: City of Love workshops and concert $1500 22-23: High caliber multi year speaker series to engage/educate our extended community and with specific attention to involving Quaker Meetings. ($25,000 - $100,000 per speaker) 21-22 Local DEI experts to come and work with our faculty, students, families ($2500 - $10,000) 21-22: Lion’s Story (Howard Stevenson) ongoing training and facilitation with all faculty and staff over the course of months. In addition to the individual work with the Race Institute, Lion’s Story is an imperative opportunity to do this work collectively as a faculty/staff/leadership team ($17,600). Includes- Virtual Client Based Course Training- participants are guided through an eighteen-hour curriculum that pairs six hours of Self-Paced Work with twelve hours of Live Facilitated Group Sessions. Live Facilitated Group Sessions are delivered over four, two - three hour sessions, meeting four to six weeks in between each session. Listening Session for BIPOC Staff/Faculty- as a PWI (Predominantly White Institution) we must hold space for our BIPOC staff/faculty to support listening & reflection of immediate racial & social justice concerns. Leadership Team Racial Literacy Institute for the MPFS administrative team to experience together and help guide policy and decision making at every level of the school. Middle School SEL (Social Emotional Learning) Programming and Speakers- a year long course that includes a variety of facilitated affinity groups (racial, gender, sexuality identities) and health classes. To provide an authentic JEDI lens (and because all learning happens in difference, not sameness) we strive to bring many voices and perspectives into the room. ($13,000) Peter, if you’d be willing to sponsor a one year grant request in the amount of $30,000 it would help us pay for this important work. Specifically it will help with the ongoing training for our faculty/staff and our middle school SEL guest speakers/workshops. MPFS pledges to be an example to our community that racial literacy and teaching social justice issues are not simply one-off lessons to be completed each year. In the same way that Friends education infuses the SPICES across subjects, our work with JEDI is a journey of learning and discovery that must be fostered throughout the curriculum and program.

Submission Date 06/22/2021

Submitter's IP 73.233.76.34