Click on row for more details

DateNameOrganization NameRequested Amount

Name of your organization. Everybody Wins DC

Person making request. Jordi Hutchinson

Best way to contact you. jhutchinson@everybodywinsdc.org

Address 1420 New York Ave. NW Suite 650 Washington, DC 20005

Website / URL https://everybodywinsdc.org/

EIN 52-1938281

Amount Requested 4000

Case for Request. At EWDC, we believe all children deserve the opportunity to thrive at school and in life. Key to this is helping kids become engaged and empowered readers. Reading is at the core of a child's ability to succeed in the classroom and their community. That's why we're working hard to help families build robust home libraries filled with stories they can read, share, and enjoy. Last year, EWDC gave away more than 13,000 free books to children across the greater DC area. And since the launch of our book distribution program in 2019, we've put more than 48,000 into kids' hands. But it isn't just about adding more books to a child's shelf - it's offering that child a chance to connect with and be inspired by the stories on the page. That's why EWDC prioritizes books that elevate and celebrate perspectives, characters, and communities too often underrepresented in children's literature. We wany to give all young readers a chance to see themselves reflected in the books they read. We also know that diverse books offer important windows into communities beyond a reader's own, promoting empathy, understanding, and inclusion. EWDC seeks support from the Snave Foundation to help us continue this important work of elevating diversity through reading so that more children can connect with stories and become engaged and empowered readers.

Submission Date 03/22/2024

Submitter's IP 222.79.103.59

Name of your organization. Wallmart

Person making request. LunaJar Luna

Best way to contact you. lunaJar@noahsmovingark.com

Address Bucharest Bucharest Bucharest, AL Romania

Website / URL

EIN LunaJar

Amount Requested 53657

Case for Request. Ηi! I applaud women who hаve the cоurаge to еnϳоy thе lоvе of mаnу women аnd сhооse thе onе who wіll bе hеr bеst frіend durіng thе bumрy and crаzy thing саllеd life. I wаnted tо be thаt frіеnd, nоt ϳuѕt thе ѕtаblе, rеlіаble, bоrіng houѕеwifе оf аn ordinarу mаrrіed cоuplе. Ι аm 26 уеars old, Lunа, frоm Denmark. Μу prоfilе is here: http://gg.gg/18yt54

Submission Date 02/27/2024

Submitter's IP 66.249.70.167

Name of your organization. Megan Atkinson

Person making request. Mulrwbuz zx c Atkinson

Best way to contact you.

Address Hardenbergstra?E 5 Hardenbergstra?E 5 Kollweiler, SC 66879

Website / URL

EIN K Rghi

Amount Requested 12

Case for Request. Hi there, We run an Instagram growth service, which increases your number of followers both safely and practically. - We guarantee to gain you 300-1000+ followers per month. - People follow you because they are interested in you, increasing likes, comments and interaction. - All actions are made manually by our team. We do not use any 'bots'. The price is just $60 (USD) per month, and we can start immediately. If you have any questions, let me know, and we can discuss further. Kind Regards, Megan Unsubscribe here: https://removeme.click/unsubscribe.php?d=snavefoundation.org

Submission Date 02/22/2024

Submitter's IP 72.14.201.164

Name of your organization. Taconic Hudson Monthly Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends

Person making request. Donna Barrett

Best way to contact you. clerkhudsonmeeting@gmail.com

Address 343 Union Street Hudson, NY 12534

Website / URL https://www.quakercloud.org/cloud/hudson-friends-meeting

EIN 90-0780165

Amount Requested 1000

Case for Request. Taghkanic Hudson Monthly Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends, known as Hudson Friends Meeting, is a small meeting that is increasing being attended by young adults. We need to expand our space to serve these young people and other families, spiritual seekers, worshippers, community residents and visitors who attend. In addition to our 1832 meeting house, located in an historic district, we own a back building that has large barn doors and a loft that suggest it was originally a carriage house. We plan to renovate and open this building for seasonal First Day school and public programs and events that promote Friends' values of simplicity, peace, integrity, community, equality and stewardship. Even in its un-renovated state, people have enjoyed being in this rustic building during our fundraising events. A Snave Foundation grant will assist us to replace the roof without risking the financial stability of our meeting. The roof replacement will cover the back building and an attached storage room that houses all of our electrical connections for both our meeting house and the back building. We have already renovated the exterior, replaced doors and broken windows, and updated the electrical box to breakers. After the reroofing, we will renovate the interior of the back building to facilitate seasonal use as a First Day school and community space. The front door of the building opens to our garden, a safe, green space for children. The large barn doors open onto a tree-lined alley with little traffic where people like to walk, making it welcoming and safe for public gatherings during the spring, summer and fall months.

Submission Date 10/05/2023

Submitter's IP 136.143.177.51

Name of your organization. Changing Perceptions

Person making request. Monte Pollard

Best way to contact you. monte@changingdcperceptions.org

Address 200 Massachusetts Avenue NW Floor 8 Washington, DC 20001

Website / URL http://www.changingdcperceptions.org/

EIN 47-5462125

Amount Requested 35000

Case for Request. Changing Perceptions is a non-profit organization based in Washington D.C. that focuses on reducing recidivism and aiding incarcerated individuals as they reintegrate into society. Here are some reasons why Snave should consider sponsoring Changing Perceptions: 1. Mission and Values: Changing Perceptions believes in respect, dignity, trust, accountability, empathy, and authenticity. We value each person as an individual and treat them with care and kindness. We are trusted and truthful partners who follow through on our commitments and always do what is right. 2. Services: Changing Perceptions offers guidance to overcome personal obstacles, build self-confidence, and develop essential skills for traditional employment and daily living. We provide a range of support services to the re-entry community, including advocacy, social support, and community engagement. 3. Success Rate: Since 2020, our clients have had a zero percent recidivism rate. Additionally, our program has a completion rate of 90%, demonstrating the effectiveness and efficiency in completing tasks. 4. Community Impact: Changing Perceptions has provided over $90,000 in Flex-Funding to aid individuals in need of assistance with food, housing, employment, and transportation. 5. Unique Approach: Changing Perceptions offers a unique and effective approach to assisting those who are reintegrating into society after incarceration. Our platform revolves around a Mentor-Mentee relationship, in which peer mentors who have experienced incarceration provide support and guidance to new re-entrants. By sponsoring Changing Perceptions, Snave would be supporting an organization that significantly impacts the lives of returning citizens and their families. This aligns with Snave's commitment to social responsibility and community engagement.

Submission Date 09/23/2023

Submitter's IP 136.143.176.51

Name of your organization. Central Moravian Church

Person making request. Martha Jones

Best way to contact you. martha@centralmoravianchurch.org

Address 73 W Church St. Bethlehem, PA 18018-5821

Website / URL http://www.centralmoravianchurch.org

EIN 24-0795954

Amount Requested 25000

Case for Request. Central Moravian Church is Bethlehem’s first congregation and the oldest Moravian Church in North America. Coming from a variety of backgrounds and traditions, our congregation today gathers to experience God’s love in a caring, respectful and inclusive atmosphere. Central Moravian Church emphasizes Christian faith, hope and love. The Saal was the central place of worship in 1741 for the early inhabitants of the Bethlehem community. It is located on the second floor of the Gemeinhaus or community house (now part of the Moravian Museum). Within a few years, the Saal could not hold the number of worshippers and in 1751 a new worship space, now known as the "Old Chapel”, was appended to the Gemeinhaus and became the new place of worship. Near the corner of Heckewelder Place and Church Street, the Old Chapel served as the place of worship for Moravians for the next 55 years until the community again needed a larger space. On April 16, 1803, the cornerstone was laid for a new Sanctuary. When completed in 1806, it was the largest church building in Pennsylvania. Boldly building a sanctuary to accommodate 1500 at worship when the population of Bethlehem was approximately 600, the congregation’s desire was to build a facility large enough to comfortably welcome the congregation and community in their present time as well as into the future. And now, in the 21st Century, Central Moravian Church must take necessary steps to ensure that the Sanctuary meets the future needs of the church family and extended community, and continues to fulfill its mission, even as it preserves the iconic 1806 structure. As Historic Moravian Bethlehem continues on the journey to achieve World Heritage Site status, the sanctuary is an integral part of Moravian Bethlehem’s history and because of the location, will likely become an even greater toured and studied facility. In proactively maintaining the church’s historic buildings, it has become necessary to address the aging and outdated heating and cooling systems that condition the Sanctuary. The Central Moravian Church Sanctuary is currently heated by four gas furnaces, three of which have reached their design life expectancies. Replacement of the current furnaces is neither possible because replacements are not available, nor warranted, given the need to eliminate fossil fuel dependency. Furthermore, a study initiated in response to the COVID pandemic of indoor air contaminants confirmed that active ventilation of the Sanctuary is required to maintain acceptable indoor air quality. Central Moravian Church has strong traditions of looking to the future and caring for creation. By upgrading the heating, cooling, and integrated ventilation system, Central Moravian Church will once again demonstrate sound stewardship and care for the health of the environment and future generations of the community.

Submission Date 07/03/2023

Submitter's IP 54.191.137.17

Name of your organization. Reading Partners

Person making request. Chloe Oliveras

Best way to contact you. chloe.oliveras@readingpartners.org

Address 5410 Wilshire Blvd. #400 Los Angeles, CA 90036

Website / URL http://readingpartners.org

EIN 77-0568469

Amount Requested 90000

Case for Request. Snave Foundation 37 Englewood Road Winchester, MA 01890 Dear Evan Kravitz and Evans Family members, On behalf of Reading Partners Los Angeles, I am thrilled to submit a letter of interest to the Snave Foundation, a family foundation that has prioritized education and other issues core to those at Reading Partners. We are excited to engage with you, and offer this letter as a starting point in the conversation. In our ongoing commitment to empower students to reach grade-level reading proficiency, Reading Partners respectfully requests a two-year, $90,000 grant from the Snave Foundation that would directly support our targeted efforts in Los Angeles and growth plan to support students in South and East Los Angeles, two of Los Angeles Unified’s most pandemic-impacted communities. Using our proven tutoring models, Reading Partners will scale to reach 1,270 students urgently in need of academic recovery by 2024-2025. Mission & History Reading Partners’ mission is to help children become lifelong readers by empowering communities to provide individualized instruction with measurable results. Reading Partners is the only national nonprofit organization with a program model that is a complete package of in-school and online, one-on-one literacy instruction by volunteers who are trained and supported by staff. Celebrating fifteen years in Los Angeles, Reading Partners empowers local communities to invest in the education of our youth, providing an effective, affordable, and community-driven solution to the literacy crisis. Since 2008, Reading Partners Los Angeles has served over 6,000 kindergarten through 4th-grade students experiencing economic disadvantages across Los Angeles County. In response to COVID-19 related school closures, Reading Partners Los Angeles created an entirely new online program, Reading Partners Connects. Through this program, we provided 12,793 virtual tutoring sessions to over 430 students across Los Angeles with the support of nearly 500 volunteer tutors. For the 2021-22 school year, we again shifted our program to a hybrid virtual and in-person model, where students connected with their tutors online from our classrooms. As we look to further our work driving educational equity through literacy tutoring, we will utilize both our in-person program and Reading Partners Connects to drastically increase the number of students we can serve. Context As students progress through elementary school, they transition from learning to read to reading to learn. While this transition can be difficult for many students, those from systemically disadvantaged communities often face more significant challenges, now exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic. According to a 2021 study by the L.A. Times, elementary school student reading scores in L.A. Unified dropped 7% over the pandemic, creating a 26 percentage point gap between Black and Latinx students and their white and Asian classmates. Despite these grim statistics, there is a bright spot: results from a matched cohort study by the California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress show increases in ELA learning rates between 2020-21 and 2021-22, suggesting that California’s focus on learning recovery is working. Ensuring equitable access to literacy resources is the key that would unlock doors to future opportunities and set students up for lifelong success. Program Description & Goals Reading Partners’ overarching goal is to help close the opportunity gap through the power of literacy. Reading Partners accomplishes this goal by intentionally partnering with Title I elementary schools across Los Angeles, where literacy resources are in short supply despite high demand. By providing equitable access to one-on-one, skills-based instruction using a research-based curriculum and bolstering a community culture rooted in educational equity, our program serves as an academic recovery partner and levels the playing field for students in communities disproportionately affected by systemic barriers to opportunities. With a blend of our in-person and online programming, Reading Partners is uniquely positioned to provide direct, individualized support to students. In each of our partner schools, Reading Partners transforms a dedicated space into a reading center, recruiting at least 50 volunteer tutors to serve at least 40 students who’ve been identified by their teacher as in need of literacy intervention, with the ability to scale up to 75 students. Our staff and AmeriCorps Members join our students in person at our reading centers Monday through Thursday from 9 am to 5 pm, where students connect with their tutors twice per week for 45-minute sessions. Our virtual tutors use video conferencing and our online curriculum, and our in-person tutors utilize our traditional program curriculum. Both our virtual and in-person curriculums are created in-house and present a series of research-based, structured lesson plans that progress from phonics instruction to comprehension strategy instruction. Content incorporates our trusted curriculum skills in innovative presentations to optimize student engagement. Tutors follow an individualized reading plan tailored to each student’s particular needs and strengths as well as Reading Partners’ strategic goals for student reading achievement. A seasoned educator supervises a portfolio of reading centers and ensures consistent results and program implementation fidelity. Reading Partners' program produces measurable improvement in students’ reading skills. We track students’ reading proficiency by grade level using Renaissance Learning’s STAR Early Literacy (for Kindergarten-second grade) and STAR Reading (for third grade and up) assessments. The results of these reliable and valid assessments provide a rigorous, dynamic, and skill-specific picture of each student’s growth and progress. The tests’ publisher, Renaissance Learning, conducted reliability and concurrent validity studies that included data from other literacy assessments and teacher reports of student skills drawn from a representatively diverse population of thousands of students in districts across the country. Using these tests, we assess our younger students to ensure they’re making strides toward developing mastery of foundational reading skills appropriate for their grade level. We assess our older students to ensure they are on track to read at grade level by year end. In partnership with Renaissance Learning, our annual program metrics are reported as follows: Objective 1: 78% of all Reading Partners’ students will meet or exceed their primary, individualized end-of-year literacy growth goal. Objective 2: 85% of all kindergarteners through second-graders will master grade-appropriate foundational literacy skills, putting them on track to read at or above grade level by third grade. Objective 3: 70% of all third- and fourth-grade students will demonstrate growth in reading scores compared to a national group of peers in the same grade. Objective 4: 70% of students will show improvement in general academic behaviors, such as class participation and regular homework completion, as reported by teacher surveys. Objective 5: 90% of teachers and principals will identify Reading Partners as a valuable asset to their school, as measured by surveys. Using our proven tutoring models, Reading Partners is scaling to reach students urgently in need of literacy support. Through extending our one-on-one tutoring models and expanding our Reading Partners Beyond offerings, which include our Take Reading With You program, curriculum licensing, train-the-trainer instruction, summer tutoring, small group tutoring and classroom push-in tutoring, we will increase the rate of learning for Los Anegeles students and foster relationships that build confidence as they transition from struggling readers to independent learners. Snave Foundation Investment A generous grant from the Snave Foundation would be instrumental in supporting the expansion of our program into South and East Los Angeles. Specifically, funds would be used for: Programmatic Staff: This includes salaries and benefits for the people who are directly responsible for ensuring successful program implementation, including our executive director, program director, four program managers, a community engagement director, and a community engagement associate. Core responsibilities include: recruiting, training, supervising, and supporting volunteer tutors; designing students’ Individualized Reading Plans; assessing and monitoring their progress; collaborating with teachers and principals; and building key community partnerships. The program team also focuses on student assessment, curriculum, program development and refinement, program quality standards and monitoring tools, and program systems and operations support. Curriculum and Program Materials: Includes a research-based curriculum set for each reading center. The 148-level program is highly structured and designed for use by those with limited educational experience. In addition, this category includes the technology necessary for program staff to execute responsibilities and track student progress. Finally, this includes supplies for each Reading Center and a variety of level-appropriate books (400-500 items per center). Administration and Data and Evaluation: A small portion of this grant will be used to cover the wages and benefits of our regional development staff and the shared services provided by the national team, including core business functions of Reading Partners such as Finance and accounting, Human Resources, Data and Evaluation, and IT. We centralize these departments at the national level and share services to keep costs low in the region. A two-year, $90,000 grant from the Snave Foundation would be an instrumental partnership that would allow Reading Partners Los Angeles to expand our reach, amplify our impact, and inspire a lifelong love of learning for hundreds of more students by the 2024-25 school year. We thank the Snave Foundation for its shared commitment to enhancing educational opportunities and hope to work together in forging a path towards equitable access to the transformative power of literacy. With sincere thanks, Chloe Oliveras Executive Director

Submission Date 06/30/2023

Submitter's IP 35.212.41.233

Name of your organization. Everybody Wins DC

Person making request. Jordi Hutchinson

Best way to contact you. jhutchinson@everybodywinsdc.org

Address 1420 New York Ave., NW, Suite 650 Washington, DC 20005

Website / URL https://everybodywinsdc.org/

EIN 52-1938281

Amount Requested 2500

Case for Request. For almost 30 years, Everybody Wins DC (EWDC) has used the power of reading to help children thrive in the classroom and in life. Our programs - one-on-one mentoring, group reading activities, and free book distributions - build better readers, stronger learners, and more confident individuals. When the pandemic closed schools in March 2020, it effectively closed EWDC programs - all our activities were delivered at school, during the school day. This could have been the end of EWDC. But instead of letting it shut us down, we spent time listening to and talking with our families and school partners to find new and better ways to serve students. The result is a stronger, more focused organization that targets resources to the communities that need us most. Today, EWDC delivers programming in neighborhoods across the Washington Metro Area, with a focus on the District of Columbia, Montgomery County, and Arlington County, and serves primarily youth (ages 5-12) who come from under-resourced communities, identify as Black or Hispanic, or attend Title 1 schools. This year, we relaunched in-person mentoring sessions at 7 locations as well as host community events across the region. This year, we've delivered more than 1,200 individualized mentoring hours, reached 600+ students in our read-alouds, and given away more than 11,000 free books, 70% of which are focused on characters and communities often underrepresented in children's literature. It has been an amazing year filled with the joy of reading. But we know more can - and should - be done. Given the need in the communities we serve, and the long-lasting impact Covid-19 has had on educational and social-emotional development, our goal is to expand in SY23-24, with a focus on Power Readers, our one-on-one mentoring program. We're targeting a 20% growth in mentoring hours delivered through expanded enrollment at target schools, including title 1 public schools in high-need communities in Washington, DC. Support from the Snave Foundation can help make that possible.

Submission Date 06/09/2023

Submitter's IP 35.209.145.241

Name of your organization. Plumstead Friends Meeting

Person making request. Bill Hoblin

Best way to contact you. 267-614-6617

Address Plumstead Friends Meeting 4914A Point Pleasant Pike Doylestown, PA 18902

Website / URL http://www.plumsteadfriendsmeeting.org

EIN 23-2642207

Amount Requested 5000

Case for Request. Plumstead Friends Meeting (PFM) respectfully requests funds to offset the cost of recoating the exterior of our meetinghouse to protect and preserve it from further damage caused by the elements. Ongoing repairs and regular maintenance of a nearly 150-year-old building depletes our yearly budgeted amount for this type of work. The meetinghouse at Plumstead Friends is much the way it was when it was rebuilt in 1875. The building has no electricity and no running water. In the winter, the primary source of heat is a wood burning stove. Our community loves the simplicity of these things and embraces the realities of worshiping in an old building. PFM was approved as a Monthly Meeting only 20 years ago. In that time, we have slowly built our financial resources to the point where we can stop using band-aid fixes to the building exterior and the floor joists and start employing longer lasting solutions. In 2015 we replaced the cracked wood burning stove. In 2019 we replaced the wooden floor and in 2022 we repointed the chimney, replaced slate roof tiles, and repaired rotted wood on the northeast outside corner of the building. Previously, an attempt to repair the exterior of the meetinghouse was made using cement, which is an incompatible material with the original pebbledash lime render coating, resulting in additional cracking. The mason we consulted with, believes this is the appropriate time to do the work because the overall coating is thin and, in some places, has fallen away completely, thus exposing the underlying, soft shale stone and exposing the building to further deterioration. The reason for all this renovation work is to protect the building from further disrepair and preserve it as an active Quaker meetinghouse for the next 150 years. This will allow future generations to enjoy the simplicity and the stillness that is literally built into the Plumstead Friends meetinghouse. The protective exterior coat on the meetinghouse is pebbledash lime render. It is original to the building and is made up of materials that are largely incompatible with most modern materials. This incompatibility is evident in some previous repair work, which is now failing. Lime render has positive qualities, such as allowing moisture to escape to the outside, which modern materials do not. The surface coating on most of the meetinghouse is intact but thin from age and acid rain. In some places, it is missing entirely; exposing underlying shale which is soft and in need of protection. There are also minor surface cracks and if not treated will widen and break off entirely. Andrew deGruchy is a mason who specialty is historic finishes. He has given us an estimate to clean the meetinghouse, correct all the incompatible repairs, and recoat the building. He did similar exterior work on the Wrightstown Meetinghouse and is highly recommended by them in addition to two Plumstead Friends Attenders. The recoating is expected to last approximately 100 years. The cost to do this work is $35,000. A scheduling deposit of $2,500 has already been paid. Work is scheduled to begin mid-September. Thank you for your consideration. Bill Hoblin

Submission Date 02/27/2023

Submitter's IP 136.143.176.51

Name of your organization. Friends Committee on National Legislation

Person making request. Saanvi Mukkara

Best way to contact you.

Address 14617 devonshire lane Frisco, TX 75035

Website / URL

EIN 53-0178883

Amount Requested 3000

Case for Request. Good Evening, Each year 400 students, recent grads, Quakers, and young adults gather for an intensive four day program to learn how to become an effective advocate. Through the Friends Committee on National Legislation’s Spring Lobby Weekend these young adults gather to learn about a specific issue and lobby Congress on that issue. In previous years the program focused on domestic policy issues like the urging of a pathway to citizenship, climate change, etc. Set for March 25-28th Spring Lobby Weekend sets to secure the federal funding of local violence interrupter programs. My name is Saanvi and I am a student in Texas who seeks to bring a delegation of students to advocate for our passions and a better world. We’re estimating the cost of round trip and lodging at $550 per youth, and your donation would be matched by our generous partners at the Friends Committee on National Legislation. Could we count on your generosity to sponsor 1-5 youth to take advantage of this remarkable learning experience? Thank you for your time and attention.

Submission Date 12/07/2022

Submitter's IP 136.143.176.50

Name of your organization. Barnes Foundation

Person making request. Laura Bramble

Best way to contact you. lbramble@barnesfoundation.org

Address 2025 Benjamin Franklin Parkway Philadelphia, PA 19130

Website / URL http://www.barnesfoundation.org

EIN 23-6000149

Amount Requested 10000

Case for Request. As you may know, Philadelphia art collector Dr. Albert C. Barnes (1872–1951) chartered the Barnes Foundation in 1922 in Merion, Pennsylvania, to teach people from all walks of life how to look at and appreciate art through the direct study of his collection. Over three decades, he acquired some of the world’s most renowned impressionist, post-impressionist, and modern paintings, including works by Renoir, Cézanne, Matisse, and Picasso. He displayed these masterpieces alongside important examples of American art; old master paintings; African sculpture; Native American objects; medieval manuscripts and sculptures; decorative and industrial arts; and antiquities from the Mediterranean region and Asia. Integrating art and craft, and objects spanning cultures and time periods, Barnes sought to demonstrate the continuity of artistic tradition and the universal impulse for creative expression. Establishing the Foundation with the mission to promote the advancement of education and the appreciation of the fine arts and horticulture, Dr. Barnes believed that art should be accessible to all and has the power to improve minds and transform lives. He implemented free art appreciation classes in 1925. To better serve his educational mission, the Barnes moved in 2012 to Center City Philadelphia. Since then, nearly 2.3 million people from all 50 states and 130 countries have visited Dr. Barnes’s unrivaled collection, participated in educational courses and seminars, attended special exhibitions, and taken part in a variety of public and community engagement programs. This year, the Barnes celebrates both the 100th anniversary of its founding, and the 10th anniversary of its move to Philadelphia, which has allowed the Barnes to become a gathering place for the community, uniting people across generations and cultures, as well as an active participant in neighborhoods, working with community partners and change agents directly in the communities we serve. In the last five years, the Barnes has taken what is, for a museum, the unusual step of growing beyond traditional artistic and educational portfolios, capitalizing on other core competencies to extend its activity significantly into the social services arena. In 2019, Valerie Gay was appointed Deputy Director for Audience Engagement & Chief Experience Officer with the charge of overseeing the Barnes’s critical work in developing and sustaining our public and community engagement programs and expanding our diversity and inclusion initiatives throughout the Philadelphia region. Under the leadership of Barbara Wong, Director of Community Engagement, the Barnes has partnered with various local and regional public service agencies, with which we have developed summer camp and after-school programs for vulnerable early learners and youth; virtual access programs for seniors and under resourced communities; job training programs for recently incarcerated individuals; community arts and education hubs in West and South Philadelphia; and ELL/ESL biliteracy development programs for immigrant families. These programs integrate the Barnes into the larger fabric of Philadelphia and reach across the city and beyond to break down traditional barriers to participation in the arts, meeting people where they live, work, study, and play. Puentes a las Arts / Bridges to the Arts, specifically, is a free arts-based biliteracy enrichment program for early learners from South Philadelphia’s Latinx immigrant community and their families, many of which are living at or below poverty level. Since 2017, the Barnes has partnered with Puentes de Salud, a Philadelphia-based nonprofit that promotes the health and wellness of the city’s growing Latinx community, in this unique learning initiative that addresses obstacles to success in education. Puentes a las Artes reaches a vulnerable population of families who lack access to high-quality learning and enrichment opportunities. Guided by bilingual teaching artists, the program offers emergent bilingual learners an opportunity to develop cognitive, linguistic, and visual literacy skills, and supports adult caregivers in developing additional strategies and activities to reinforce and extend learning at home. Through this initiative, students also demonstrate a growing independence, gain social/emotional confidence in the classroom, become more comfortable with new vocabulary, and switch between English and Spanish to express ideas. Along with after-school instruction, the program provides training and resources for parents, caregivers, and siblings through bilingual family tours, workshops, and family programming at the Barnes. Puentes a las Artes has fostered trusting relationships across participants, parents, and partners, ensuring a greater likelihood for a positive start to children’s early education and a continuity in developing socialization skills. During the pandemic, Barnes staff developed a hybrid approach where teaching artists and staff have worked to stay connected to early learners and their families remotely, as continuity is critical to ensuring momentum for early learning and development. Programming has included bilingual weekly classes on Zoom with virtual visits to the Barnes collection and art-making lessons, home delivery of books and art kits, monthly check-in calls to support at-home literacy development, and open access to videos of teaching artists and staff reading storybooks. In these uncertain times, Puentes a las Artes continues to provide high-quality learning and social-emotional support for early learners as well as essential support services for parents. With the ongoing pandemic, this program has not only advanced the biliteracy development of early learners, but school teachers have highlighted their appreciation for the program’s impact on building their students’ school readiness. Students who participate in Puentes a las Artes are observed to be better equipped with the social emotional skills, curiosity and confidence necessary to be successful in kindergarten and Head Start classrooms. The Barnes aims to resume in-person afterschool programming for the 2022-23 academic year, while also continuing some remote learning to meet the needs of more early learners and families. Family workshops and visits to the Barnes will continue once a month. Puentes a las Artes programming exemplifies the Quaker values of equality and community, building bridges, encouraging trust and dialogue, and supporting under-resourced Latinx communities in their effort to improve their lives, education and circumstances. As the Snave Foundation provides support for not-for-profit educational institutions that reflect Quaker ideals, the Barnes Foundation respectfully requests Foundation sponsorship to submit a Major Grant proposal for this community engagement initiative. Thank you for your kind consideration of this request.

Submission Date 05/04/2022

Submitter's IP 136.143.176.51

Name of your organization. Friends Place on Capitol Hill (Friends Place)

Person making request. Alex Wilson

Best way to contact you. alexwilson@fcnl.org

Address 515 E Capitol Street, SE Washington, DC 20003

Website / URL https://www.friendsplacedc.org/

EIN 52-0846718

Amount Requested 1000

Case for Request. Friends Place on Capitol Hill (Friends Place) respectfully requests $1,000 from the SNAVE Foundation to help us design and launch an experiential Quaker civic engagement program for young people—from middle school to college aged. A 501(c)3 Quaker guesthouse and learning center previously known as William Penn House, Friends Place advances civic engagement for young people. Purchased in 1966 by the Friends Meeting of Washington to accommodate Quaker anti-war activists working with the Friends Committee on National Legislation, this historic property on East Capitol Street has been integral to the Quaker presence on Capitol Hill and has served as an important organizing space. For example, William Penn House opened its doors to the Poor People’s Campaign in 1968 and provided organizers with a place to plan Resurrection City. In more recent years, William Penn House served as a housing and hospitality center for members of youth movements (including the Sunrise Movement) as they prepared for and participated in protests in the nation’s capital. William Penn House formally transferred its operations to the FCNL Education Fund in 2019 to sustain and grow a Quaker presence in Washington D.C. Friends Place maintains a separate Board of Directors, operates under its own tax-exempt status, and currently receives recoverable grants from the FCNL Education Fund for operating expenses. To limit overhead, we operate under a shared services model: the FCNL Education Fund provides needed fundraising, communications, and administrative support. The goal is for Friends Place to achieve full financial sustainability by 2024 through building use revenue and individual donors. Friends Place and the SNAVE Foundation A new movement for a richer civic education in the United States is alive and well. Prompted by partisan divisiveness, racial reckoning, the health of the planet and structural economic, political and social changes that challenge the cohesion of American democracy, the 2021 “Educating for American Democracy” report offers a roadmap for education in self-governance. Schools are on the forefront of assuring that children understand the American experiment and their role in it. Community and faith groups, non-profit organizations, labor unions, and businesses all play a role in assuring full and equitable participation in our communities, our country, and in the world. Friends Place will play a role in the movement for stronger civic education and engagement. With the SNAVE Foundation’s support, Friends Place will build on its 55-year history of success as we launch an experiential Quaker civic engagement program for middle, high school, and college students that complements and extends the civic education received in school. This programming will be offered year-round and will be adaptable to school schedules and curriculum requirements. Centered around how people power creates justice, peace, a healthy planet, and a stronger democracy, Friends Place programming will engage young people in solutions to structural problems that prohibit the full realization of American democracy. Quaker faith and practice offer profound opportunities for young people to experience lifelong leadings for social justice work. With robust programming that is ethically and morally grounded in Quakerism, Friends Place will empower F/friends to put their faith into action and live their convictions. The Director of Friends Place, Sarah Johnson, will develop, market, and operationalize our new programming as well as establish partnerships with F/friends middle, high, and post-secondary schools; churches; meetings; and organizations that will bring groups to stay at Friends Place. Several institutions that have already expressed interest in bringing student groups to Friends Place include Wilmington College (OH), Dallas Peace and Justice Center (TX), and Friends Seminary (NY). We look forward to engaging these institutions in Friends Place programming while building a broader participant base. Committed to fostering inclusive programming that reaches diverse, multi-cultural audiences, we will pay particular attention to establishing partnerships with historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs), Hispanic-serving institutions (HSIs), Tribal colleges and universities (TCUs), and faith-based organizations. We will begin offering programming in early 2022. Conclusion With the SNAVE Foundation’s support and partnership, we will help young people across the country to recognize their power and role in democracy. These young people will leave Friends Place with knowledge they can take back to their communities, extending the impact of our experiential learning opportunity across the country. Thank you in advance for your time and consideration of our request, and please do not hesitate to reach out with any questions.

Submission Date 09/29/2021

Submitter's IP 136.143.177.50

Name of your organization. Friends Place on Capitol Hill

Person making request. Alex Wilson

Best way to contact you. alexwilson@fcnl.org

Address 515 E Capitol Street, SE Washington, DC 20003

Website / URL

EIN 52-0846718

Amount Requested 150000

Case for Request. Friends Place on Capitol Hill (Friends Place) respectfully requests $150,000 over two years from the SNAVE Foundation to repair and modernize our historic, 104-year-old Quaker building as well as design and pilot an experiential Quaker civic engagement program for middle, high school, and college students. Friends Place, a 501(c)3 Quaker guesthouse and learning center previously known as William Penn House, advances civic engagement for young people. Purchased in 1966 by the Friends Meeting of Washington to accommodate Quaker anti-war activists working with the Friends Committee on National Legislation (FCNL), William Penn House has been integral to the Quaker presence on Capitol Hill and has served as an important organizing space. For example, William Penn House opened its doors to the Poor People’s Campaign in 1968 and provided organizers with a place to plan Resurrection City. William Penn House formally transferred its operations to the FCNL Education Fund in 2019 and began its next phase of service as Friends Place on Capitol Hill: an FCNL Education Fund subsidiary and FCNL-affiliate organization. Since 2019, and despite the COVID-19 pandemic, we have worked to upgrade and modernize the building. With the SNAVE Foundation’s support, we will be able to finish building repairs this fall and accommodate overnight guests beginning spring 2022. To-date, we have made substantial progress in major repairs to the roof, electrical equipment, and plumbing. Following these and other structural repairs, we will focus on needed improvements like painting, floor refinishing, new appliances, and furnishings. When finished, Friends Place will feature a conference space equipped for remote meetings, a second-floor meeting room that adjoins a dining room/kitchen area, and seven sleeping rooms that can accommodate up to 29 overnight guests. With the Foundation’s support, Friends Place will also design and pilot an experiential Quaker civic engagement program for middle, high school, and college students that complements and extends the civic education received in school. Centered around how people power creates justice, peace, a healthy planet, and a stronger democracy, Friends Place programming (which may include a direct service-learning component) will engage young people in solutions to structural problems that prohibit the full realization of American democracy. Quaker faith and practice offers profound opportunities for young people to experience lifelong leadings for social justice work. With robust programming that is ethically and morally grounded in Quakerism, Friends Place will empower F/friends to put their faith into action and become effective advocates for the world they seek. We are in the process of hiring a Director of Friends Place to develop, market, and test our new program as well as establish formal partnerships with F/friends middle, upper, and post-secondary schools; churches; meetings; and organizations that will bring groups to stay at Friends Place. Through FCNL’s Young Adult Program, we have fostered robust partnerships with several Quaker-based institutions that have already expressed interest in bringing student groups to Friends Place, including Wilmington College. We plan to launch virtual programming in winter 2021 and begin offering in-person programming in spring 2022. Friends Place currently receives recoverable grants from the FCNL Education Fund to cover operating expenses and, to limit overhead, operates under a shared services model; the FCNL Education Fund provides needed fundraising, communications, and administrative support. With the SNAVE Foundation’s partnership over the first two years of Friends Place’s rebirth, we will ensure the organization achieves full financial sustainability by 2024 and can grow in the years to come. Thank you in advance for your time and consideration of our request, and please do not hesitate to reach out with any questions.

Submission Date 06/23/2021

Submitter's IP 204.141.42.226

Name of your organization. Media Providence Friends School

Person making request. Cynthia McGoff

Best way to contact you. cmcgoff@mpfs.org

Address 125 W. Third Street Media, PA 19063

Website / URL http://mpfs.org

EIN 23-1386177

Amount Requested 30000

Case for Request. Long before 1954, when the Supreme Court decided Brown vs. Board of Education, MPFS enrolled its first student of color. "The school met with its most serious financial crisis, not from the Depression but from the admission of its first Negro student in 1937" (A Century of Love and Learning). Despite being a Quaker institution, and living by the Quaker Testimonies, a number of families protested and MPFS lost about 30% of its enrollment and, yet, did not waver in its decision. This decision directly informed the type of school MPFS would grow to become today: a learning community that not only teaches social justice but is committed to evolving our understanding of race and racism to best serve our community. In the Spring of 2020, we knew it was important to share more explicitly how we incorporate our Justice, Equity, Diversity, Inclusivity (JEDI) work into our program, across all subjects and throughout the year. Hence the birth of the MPFS JEDI Task Force, made up of teachers, families, administration, and trustees. Our JEDI goals, broadly outlined, are to foster positive identities (racial, gender, religion, sexuality, family structure, class & ability) in our students, staff, families, and trustees, and encourage their personal development by: raising awareness and building literacy by engaging in explicit conversations about our identities honoring the intersectionality that exists within ourselves and members of our community, thus increasing our capacity for empathy encouraging our community to take action when they see injustice, prejudice, and bigotry in the world. We understand this work is dynamic and ongoing and will require us to continue to learn and grow. Teachers have incorporated social justice in a wide variety of ways over many years, and not just in January and February. Social Justice is wide-reaching across subjects and is honored throughout the curriculum all year long. We are committed to being more intentional about communicating and sharing our JEDI work with our community, as well as bringing more professional development and family events centered around JEDI topics and engagement. Some of these have/will include: 20-21:The MPFS Listening Campaign, facilitated by the Philly Children’s Movement ($2500). We intend to include members of our extended communities in 21-22 The Race Institute (faculty training) with Toni Graves Williamson and Ali Michaels, 50% of our faculty are trained 20-21. We aim to train the remaining 50% (21-22 for $13,000) February 2021: Access to the film Virtually Free by Andre Robert Lee ($5000). We intend to schedule more film screenings in the coming years ($5000+ for 21-22) February 2021: Q&A sessions with Andre Robert Lee for our middle school students and our families April 2021: Sonja Cherry Paul joins our faculty meeting and also presents to families. $2500 April 2021: City of Love workshops and concert $1500 22-23: High caliber multi year speaker series to engage/educate our extended community and with specific attention to involving Quaker Meetings. ($25,000 - $100,000 per speaker) 21-22 Local DEI experts to come and work with our faculty, students, families ($2500 - $10,000) 21-22: Lion’s Story (Howard Stevenson) ongoing training and facilitation with all faculty and staff over the course of months. In addition to the individual work with the Race Institute, Lion’s Story is an imperative opportunity to do this work collectively as a faculty/staff/leadership team ($17,600). Includes- Virtual Client Based Course Training- participants are guided through an eighteen-hour curriculum that pairs six hours of Self-Paced Work with twelve hours of Live Facilitated Group Sessions. Live Facilitated Group Sessions are delivered over four, two - three hour sessions, meeting four to six weeks in between each session. Listening Session for BIPOC Staff/Faculty- as a PWI (Predominantly White Institution) we must hold space for our BIPOC staff/faculty to support listening & reflection of immediate racial & social justice concerns. Leadership Team Racial Literacy Institute for the MPFS administrative team to experience together and help guide policy and decision making at every level of the school. Middle School SEL (Social Emotional Learning) Programming and Speakers- a year long course that includes a variety of facilitated affinity groups (racial, gender, sexuality identities) and health classes. To provide an authentic JEDI lens (and because all learning happens in difference, not sameness) we strive to bring many voices and perspectives into the room. ($13,000) Peter, if you’d be willing to sponsor a one year grant request in the amount of $30,000 it would help us pay for this important work. Specifically it will help with the ongoing training for our faculty/staff and our middle school SEL guest speakers/workshops. MPFS pledges to be an example to our community that racial literacy and teaching social justice issues are not simply one-off lessons to be completed each year. In the same way that Friends education infuses the SPICES across subjects, our work with JEDI is a journey of learning and discovery that must be fostered throughout the curriculum and program.

Submission Date 06/22/2021

Submitter's IP 73.233.76.34